August 28, 2016
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Time to school these boys in some #golf – yeah boyee!

August 28, 2016

I’m at Seminole, FL! Time to school these boys in some #golf – yeah boyee!

http://4sq.com/9EEsNx
August 28, 2016

Time to school these boys in some #golf – yeah boyee!

I’m at Seminole, FL! http://4sq.com/9EEsNx
August 27, 2016

Inside ‘The Attack That Almost Broke the Internet’

In March 2013, a coalition of spammers and spam-friendly hosting firms pooled their resources to launch what would become the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack the Internet had ever witnessed. The assault briefly knocked offline the world’s largest anti-spam organization, and caused a great deal of collateral damage to innocent bystanders in the process. Here’s a never-before-seen look at how that attack unfolded, and a rare glimpse into the shadowy cybercrime forces that orchestrated it. The following are excerpts taken verbatim from a series of Skype and IRC chat room logs generated by a group of “bullet-proof cybercrime hosts” — so called because they specialized in providing online hosting to a variety of clientele involved in spammy and scammy activities. Facebook profile picture of Sven Olaf Kamphuis Gathered under the banner ‘STOPhaus,’ the group included a ragtag collection of hackers who got together on the 17th of March 2013 to launch what would quickly grow to a 300+Gigabits per second (Gbps) attack on Spamhaus.org, an anti-spam organization that they perceived as a clear and present danger to their spamming operations. The attack –a stream of some 300 billion bits of data per second — was so large that it briefly knocked offline Cloudflare, a company that specialized in helping organizations stay online in the face of such assaults. Cloudflare dubbed it “The Attack that Almost Broke the Internet.” The campaign was allegedly organized by a Dutchman named Sven Olaf Kamphuis (pictured above). Kamphuis ran a company called CB3ROB, which in turn provided services for a Dutch company called “Cyberbunker,” […]
August 27, 2016

DEF CON 24: Warwalking at DEF CON, Semaphor, Mousejack and Keysniffer – Hak5 2026

August 27, 2016
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Warberry Pi Is a Dead-Simple Pen Testing Toolkit for the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a surprisingly useful tool to test the strength of your network. To add another tool to your network testing kit, Warberry Pi is a self-contained set of scripts that run automatically when you plug your Raspberry Pi into a ethernet port. How to Build a Portable Hacking Station with a Raspberry Pi and Kali Linux Cracking Wi-Fi passwords, spoofing accounts, and testing networks for exploits is all fun enough,…Read more The Warberry Pi has tons of scripts installed that run when you connect it to a network. Just plug your Pi in, power it up, and it’ll monitor network activity, collecting details like IP addresses, MAC addresses, and more. It then logs all this info so you can gather it later over SSH or by checking the Pi itself. This is only meant to test your own network, but if you’re curious about just how insecure your Wi-Fi network is, this is an interesting way to test it out. The Warberry Pi GitHub page has everything you’ll need. Warberry Pi | GitHub View the original post on Lifehacker.com: http://lifehacker.com/warberry-pi-is-a-dead-simple-pen-testing-toolkit-for-th-1785503906
August 27, 2016

[Liked] @WIRED’s tweet

WhatsApp's privacy cred just took a big hit https://t.co/X0n0pguK9g — WIRED (@WIRED) August 27, 2016
August 27, 2016

[Liked] @tarastrong’s tweet

#MarriedLifeDateNight compliments http://pic.twitter.com/zmiASViSPQ — tara strong (@tarastrong) August 27, 2016